Is your site’s lack of mobile readiness hurting you?

Is your site’s lack of mobile readiness hurting you?

How many times have you visited a website on your phone or tablet and found out it wasn’t responsive* design? You couldn’t read it easily, got frustrated, and bounced out? Given that fully half of all web pages are viewed on mobile devices, the importance of a responsive site seems painfully obvious if only from the standpoint of readability. Now there’s another reason your website should be mobile-friendly: it matters in Google search results and is about to matter a lot more. Read more about Google’s algorithm update here. How does your site stack up in mobile-friendliness? Even if you have a responsive site, Google may not see it that way. Test your site here. In addition to the mobile friendly test, the page also has helpful articles about how to make your site more mobile-friendly. Bottom line: make sure your website is responsive (you could have a stand-alone mobile site, but why?) and that Google sees it that it is mobile friendly. *rewrites itself based on the device where it is being viewed If you found this post useful, share it with your audience. Kim Phillips is a marketer, artist and teacher who helps companies of all sizes reach their audiences with creative branding, social media, websites, content management, email marketing, and direct mail. She is based in Nashville, Tennessee. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+   Lucid Marketing can help you make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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Website Design

Website Design

Your branded presence online… Website design is more than the look. Choosing the best platform, organizing content into the most logical navigation, writing for search engine optimization, posting strategies for updates, adding extras, setting up analytics for tracking, and integrating social media all affect the experience of the website’s visitors. We provide: project management graphic design content management social media integration writing and editing blog consultation Working with a select group of developers, we help you create a site that reflects your organization’s brand and work while objectively representing the site visitor. Examples include: Happy Health to You – simple, unhosted site for a wellness consultant Flying Elephant Book – blog site with social media tie-in for author Travel Beyond Paris – hosted site with blog for small group travel company Hebrica Judaic Art – hosted site with blog and e-commerce for artist Palmer Solutions – hosted site for executive coach and consultant Contact Lucid Marketing about website design...

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Please, God, make it stop. The worst website ever.

Please, God, make it stop. The worst website ever.

If you’re considering getting a new website built for your business, the website for Evangel Cathedral is a blessing in disguise. The designer of www.evangelcathedral.net has shown you the way not to do it. Every possible transgression of branding, design, and technology has been assembled in one miraculous little package. 1. Let’s start with technology. The site is built entirely from Flash, pretty whiz-bang stuff back in the 90s but fairly useless now. Search engines don’t see it, which is merciful in this case. If the spirit moves you, take peek at the source code. 2. Next up, sensory assault. If you clicked on the link above, you are likely reaching for the aspirin, some sunglasses, and the mute button. Maybe even some demon rum to calm your nerves. 3. Intro. Before you get to the main event, there is a head-trippy intro to put you in the mood. You can skip it, if you haven’t been blinded by all the Flash and can find the little button. Who uses an intro any more? 4. Branding. The logo isn’t too bad, but the fish swimming through it is distracting. Doesn’t matter…the real brand seems to rest upon the good bishop, judging from the number and variety of images of him. Seems handsome and jovial, but enough already. 5. Content. If you can stand it, click on any of the left-hand navigation. This place has a ton going on, but who can stay to read about it? There is so much movement and noise, you’re probably thinking that hell must be exactly like this. Don’t get me wrong… these look like very fine folks doing a lot of good work. But please, God, save us from the worst website ever. If you find this post helpful, please share with colleagues. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn | Google+ Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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Want to be first in Google search? Stop blocking the way.

Want to be first in Google search? Stop blocking the way.

Joe Shlemiel, owner of Joe’s Outrageously Cheep Hammers in Newark, New Jersey, types the following into his browser:  www.joesoutrageouslycheephammers.com and badda-boom, badda-bing! His website turns up first in Google search results. I’m good to go, thinks Joe. He doesn’t check his Google analytics, so he doesn’t know that only his current customers or people who find him completely by accident have ever clicked on his site. If they have. He had his nephew put up an all-Flash website 10 years ago, and he hasn’t changed it since. He’s never tried searching on “tools Newark” or “affordable tools” or anything that an actual person who never heard of him might type into their browser. Even if he did, his website is built on technology so old that it won’t be seen by search engines anyway. He’s not registered with any online directories. He did a postcard once, a few years ago, but it didn’t bring him any business. He runs a two-inch ad every week in the local newspaper he never reads. And he wonders why his hammers are getting dusty. It’s the bad economy, he tells himself. “Build it and they will come” may work in baseball fantasies, but it’s not marketing. Joe has competition… really, really big competition. If he’s going to sell hammers, what he really needs to sell is a better experience; people can get hammers lots of places, and they will probably buy a hammer at the first place they see that has them. Joe would do better to engage his prospects with the results of the hammer purchase… DIY tutorials about home improvement projects, thrilled spouse over a repair finally done, happy kid in tree house built with dad’s hammer… whatever moves the buyer emotionally. Did you find this post helpful? If so, please share with colleagues. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn | Google+ Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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Great websites that don't have to be.

Great websites that don't have to be.

If you’ve ever tried to do any of these things in person – renew your driver’s license, find income tax forms, or get information about doing a bulk mailing – you may have hit a wall of red tape and indifference. Doing these things online, and much more, can now be fast and pleasant. What is the motivation for government and quasi-government entities to build websites with such visual and functional elegance? You might say it’s to save money by reducing the need for actual humans to do the work, but they could do that with clunky websites and still hire less people. If you’ve ever been to the post office in the rest of the world, you may not have had a fast, pleasant experience. (I’m guessing Germany has an efficient postal system but have never tried it.) Here are three websites that are fabulous, whether or not they have to be. www.irs.gov | www.tennessee.gov | www.usps.com True, the post office now has competition, but can anyone really eliminate snail mail from their lives? What is your favorite great-but-doesn’t-have-to-be...

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How about your "About Us" page?

How about your "About Us" page?

Very often, companies use the About Us page to list stats, locations, and other useful – but dull – information about the organization.  Somewhat more savvy, but no less dull, is jamming the space with key phrases to attract the search engines.  Site visitors will form an opinion about the place from what’s on, or absent from, the About Us page.  Why not use it to give a real sense of what the company or nonprofit organization is like?  There are many ways to do this, as Brian Eisenberg outlines in the ClickZ blog. Beyond connecting with site visitors on a personal level, there is another, wiser way to use the About Us page to attract search engine notice.  The web bots are constantly crawling the internet, looking for new, relevant content.  Set up your About Us page with sub-pages (click on the image to see how gap.com does it), and change the content frequently.  Be sure the first few words of text on each page and sub-page are packed with relevant keywords and phrases.  Get found by the search engines, but write for people. Visit your About Us page right now… we’ll wait. What did you find there?  Is it interesting to visitors?  Does it address any issue, problem, or desire they may have? You can find out more about us here.  If you’d like some help with editing your website, we’re all about helping with that. Join us on Facebook | follow on Twitter...

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