A little-known tool to help you clean up your Facebook feed.

A little-known tool to help you clean up your Facebook feed.

The longer you’re on Facebook, the more friends you gather and the less you interact with some of them. Facebook’s algorithm limits posts you see from everyone, especially those you don’t interact with much. But if you want to fine-tune your newsfeed further, you can either go through the laborious task of putting each friend into a list, or you can use Facebook’s handy little Organize tool to further clean up your Facebook feed. Here’s how it looks: Of course, it does beg the question: if you don’t interact with those folks, would they miss you if you were gone? It could be that it’s time to have fewer Facebook friends. Since Facebook is already doing the math by reducing how much you see in the name of “relevance,” paring down your friend list could result in more relevant posts for you. If you clean up your Facebook feed with this little Organize tool, let us know how it went for you. Did it help? Subscribe at the top of the page and you’ll receive a notice whenever there is a new post on this blog. If this post was helpful to you, please share it with a colleague. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+     this post Lucid Marketing has the skills to make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this site....

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The one secret to increasing Facebook reach that nobody talks about.

The one secret to increasing Facebook reach that nobody talks about.

Social media marketers are sick to death of discussions about how to (try to) beat Facebook’s algorithm. Post reach has gone so low that some have either stopped posting altogether or have caved in to purchase Facebook advertising. Reach as low as 2% has been reported, making other channels look more appealing to marketers. We’ve tried everything: contests, apps, posting multiple images, video; even killer content sometimes falls flat. But there’s one secret to increasing Facebook reach that nobody talks about: homogeneity. The more alike your Facebook fan base is, the more likely it is that you can find and create engaging content for them. It has always been the case, from old-school one-way advertising until now, that it’s easier to reach people effectively the more they have in common. Targeting and segmenting are still the key. What determines how homogenous the group is may be age, gender, interest, socio-economic level, or geography. If you can get more than one of those factors within the group, you’ve got some real potential for reaching them with the right message. Case in Point Kingston Springs, Tennessee is a little bedroom community of Nashville that has about 3,500 residents. The town sits at the very Southern tip of the county, separated not only geographically but also socio-demographically and ideologically. It considers itself unique and, indeed, it is. Many people know each other, the town has a long history, and there is a great deal of community pride. When the town decided to start a farmer’s market, the market’s new Facebook page got over 600 likes right away; about 17% of the community liked the page. What municipality gets 17% of its residents to do anything, ever? But the really striking metric is an average post reach of 43% without any boosting or other paid advertising. While Facebook won’t say exactly what goes into its algorithm that determines post visibility and therefore reach (and the possibility of engagement), certain factors are known to help, such as posting pictures and videos vs. text-only posts. Indeed, some of the photo albums on Kingston Springs Farmers & Artisans Market page have gotten over 300% reach. The page uses a number of best practices. But what is most striking in this example is the homogeneity of the group. The interest of its members is very high for things going on in their community, and there aren’t as many retail and other outlets competing for their attention.   Homogeneity is the one secret to increasing Facebook reach that nobody talks about. So what is a social media manager to do if its constituents are diverse? Here are some things to do that can help: 1. Create separate pages....

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Is Facebook customer service a last resort for angry customers?

Is Facebook customer service a last resort for angry customers?

No matter how good, or how bad, your company’s products and services are, your Facebook page is a de facto customer service channel. And it’s a very public one. Unhappy customers may go there to vent, but if it’s the only place they can go to do that, you’ve got troubles. Here are some ways you can keep the whole world from knowing that people think you suck. 1. Don’t give them much to complain about. Seems obvious, but quite a number of companies miss that. 2. Give them somewhere else to complain. Make sure your website has a way to contact you by direct email, telephone, or a web contact form that someone actually responds to. Don’t send customers down a rat-hole, where they only get madder. 3. If the angry customer ends up on Facebook, respond quickly. Apologize (sincerely), then try to take the conversation elsewhere. 4. Be personal. Refer to the person by name, and don’t feed them boilerplate. People scroll through your page to see how you’ve handled other complaints, and stock answers look bad. 5. Do not sanitize your Facebook page. Deleting negative posts destroys credibility. People know that companies screw up; it’s how you handle it that really makes the difference. 6. Throw yourself on your sword. The customer may not be right, but pointing that out will get you nowhere. Take the lumps. 7. If you can’t be real, stay off social media. Social media is about people, and it’s run by the users. Some companies (think big utilities, phone companies, and cable providers) aren’t helping themselves by endless streams of comments from screaming customers. They should just buy ads and be done with it. More on that here. Facebook customer service can be done well, or it can be the last stop for angry customers to vent. When they do, their friends see it. Sometimes it just takes a little sugar to turn them into happy fans. If this post was helpful, you can subscribe at the top of the page; please share with a colleague. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+     this post With over 30 years of experience in financial services marketing, Lucid Marketing has the skills to make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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Why you should have fewer Facebook friends.

Why you should have fewer Facebook friends.

Slate Magazine recently published an interesting article (link below) about the great Facebook dilemma: to unfriend, or not to unfriend? We’ve all accepted friend requests like free beers at a keg party; with Facebook, the hangover goes on and on. Given the way that Facebook’s algorithm works, it may make sense to pare down your friend list. FB only shows you stuff from people you interact with most ~ if they showed you every post by every friend you’d lose your mind ~ so no problem having a gazillion friends, right? Maybe not. The average Facebook user has over 200 friends, but if you subtract the users who signed up, got five friends, then never looked at Facebook again, active users probably have 500 or 1,000 friends. Let’s define interaction on Facebook as commenting on someone’s posts, tagging them, writing on their timeline, and sharing their posts. A user with 500 friends may only interact with 15 or 20 different people weekly, maybe twice that monthly. If 40 of the people you interact with weekly post two things a week, that’s 80 posts, and Facebook probably lets you see a fraction of those. Wouldn’t it then stand to reason that the person you friended long ago but never interact with is dragging down the odds of your seeing posts from people you DO interact with, or would like to interact with? This is a theory, of course, because Facebook doesn’t divulge exactly how their algorithm works. But it makes sense that it may be better to have fewer Facebook friends. So, go ahead and whittle down your friend list. It’s likely that the gal you met at a chamber mixer five years ago won’t even know you’re gone, and you may be doing you both a favor, algorithmically speaking. Read the Slate.com article | Pew Research Center Facebook Facts If this post was helpful, you can subscribe at the top of the page; please share with a colleague. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+     this post With over 30 years of experience in financial services marketing, Lucid Marketing has the skills to make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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An Instagram hack you probably never thought of.

An Instagram hack you probably never thought of.

It’s the nature of Instagram to encourage on-the-spot posts of photos from a mobile phone. For social media managers, this can be less than convenient. Wouldn’t it be nice if you could simply upload photos straight to Instagram from your desktop? It would, but you can’t. So, here’s a little Instagram hack you probably never thought of, step by step. 1. Drag a photo into your Dropbox folder on your desktop. Be sure you have both the Instagram app and Dropbox on your phone. 2. Go to your phone, and open the photo in your Dropbox folder. Tap it to find your options, one of which will be Export. 3. Export the photo to Instagram. Continue with the post in Instagram as normal. That’s it! The little Instagram hack you probably never thought of. If this post was helpful, you can subscribe at the top of the page; please share with a colleague. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+     this post With over 30 years of experience in financial services marketing, Lucid Marketing has the skills to make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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Missing the boat on bank marketing?

Missing the boat on bank marketing?

There is arguably no industry that knows more information about its customers than the banking industry. That should mean that they are in the best position to market additional services to them. The truism that your customers are your best prospects is still true. Yet, most banks don’t use the information they already have to the best advantage. Some are stuck in service (i.e. reactive, rather than proactive) mode, others have outdated systems, and yet others are limited by their vision of what financial services really mean to the customer and customers-to-be. The truth is that banking customers aren’t really very interested in banking at all. They are interested in their lives, and access to money is something they’d rather not spend much time getting; they just want it to be there. Knowing a banker personally means less to the customer every day, and visiting a branch is not something most people care to do. Life simply moves too fast for most people to stop by and chew the fat with the local banker. How, then, does a financial institution have a relationship with someone? The Great Social Media Scare Facebook was founded in 2004, and it would be safe to say it has become, um, rather popular. So have Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, SnapChat, LinkedIn, and lots of other social media platforms. Suddenly, there became a place where people could interact with brands, and talk about them. No longer could companies control the message about themselves by pushing out ads and dropping press releases. This left companies with two choices: join the conversation, or let the chips fall where they may. Naturally, the wild-and-wooly nature of social media makes banks nervous. Regulators, accustomed to examining a bank’s advertising according to their black-and-white “do this, don’t do this” rules, suddenly have to deal with a whole new animal that is neither advertising nor PR. They have misunderstood it from the git-go. This makes bankers even more nervous than it makes the regulators, and a whole cottage industry of consultants stepped into the fray to scare them even further. (And offer solutions, of course.) Some banks opted out completely; others proceeded cautiously. Very few financial institutions have entered the social arena well, accustomed as they are to one-way, controlled communcation. This is hurting banks’ credibility with customers and prospects. Taking 10 years to embrace a new communication channel is simply too long. Where the Fish Are As good as banks are at gathering information about customers, almost none develop a vibrant prospect database for bank marketing. Current customers are the best prospects, but they aren’t the only ones and someday the current ones will be gone. Banks need to do a...

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