Is your site’s lack of mobile readiness hurting you?

Is your site’s lack of mobile readiness hurting you?

How many times have you visited a website on your phone or tablet and found out it wasn’t responsive* design? You couldn’t read it easily, got frustrated, and bounced out? Given that fully half of all web pages are viewed on mobile devices, the importance of a responsive site seems painfully obvious if only from the standpoint of readability. Now there’s another reason your website should be mobile-friendly: it matters in Google search results and is about to matter a lot more. Read more about Google’s algorithm update here. How does your site stack up in mobile-friendliness? Even if you have a responsive site, Google may not see it that way. Test your site here. In addition to the mobile friendly test, the page also has helpful articles about how to make your site more mobile-friendly. Bottom line: make sure your website is responsive (you could have a stand-alone mobile site, but why?) and that Google sees it that it is mobile friendly. *rewrites itself based on the device where it is being viewed If you found this post useful, share it with your audience. Kim Phillips is a marketer, artist and teacher who helps companies of all sizes reach their audiences with creative branding, social media, websites, content management, email marketing, and direct mail. She is based in Nashville, Tennessee. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+   Lucid Marketing can help you make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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How much is too much on Twitter?

How much is too much on Twitter?

If you’re wondering if it’s possible to post too often on Twitter, it sort of depends. If you’re a celebrity with a ton of fans, nothing seems to be too much. Even for businesses, it takes being really obnoxious for people to unfollow. It’s just the nature of Twitter; the tweets wash over you in a gentle stream, easy to ignore. That’s about to change. Twitter Inc. has struck a deal with Google Inc. to make its 140-character updates more searchable online. Any marketer paying any attention at all will up the ante on Twitter. There will likely be a torrent of tweets, and those tweeters had better make sure their tweets are strategic, relevant, well-tagged and creative. As the flow increases, the odds of your tweets getting noticed (on Twitter, at least) will decrease. You can use the “spray-and-pray” technique − sheer quantity − or you can actually be interesting. Read the Bloomberg article here. How will you up your Twitter game? If you found this post useful, share it with your audience. Kim Phillips is a marketer, artist and teacher who helps companies of all sizes reach their audiences with creative branding, social media, websites, content management, email marketing, and direct mail. She is based in Nashville, Tennessee. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+   Lucid Marketing can help you make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this site....

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The Art of Social Media: Tips for Power Users – A Review

The Art of Social Media: Tips for Power Users – A Review

A Review of The Art of Social Media: Tips for Power Users By Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick The promotional copy for this new book about how to do social media right claims “no fluff,” and they mean it. The Art of Social Media gets right down to business with practical direction on how to feed the content monster, repurpose your content for maximum effect, and finesse your posts from blogs to Facebook, Google+, Twitter and more. I first encountered Peg Fitzpatrick a few years ago while writing for the 12Most.com blog she co-manages. Since that time, I have seen her everywhere—and I do mean everywhere—in social media. She is one of a handful of social media professionals I follow closely and absolutely trust. Guy Kawasaki, formerly of a little outfit called Apple, is the chief evangelist of Canva. Together, there isn’t much they don’t know about social media and content marketing. The terms “evangelist” and “guru” are so overused that they have actually become objects of derision by professional marketers, and deservedly so. Those labels don’t apply here, because they have overtones of blind devotion to some kind of religion that is entirely about personal belief. Peg and Guy  do have followers, but they earned them by being right. If you didn’t believe before that social media is a real marketing job, you’ll believe it now. If I had any wishes at all for The Art of Social Media, they would be these: a few more paragraphs about the power of professional groups in social media, particularly on LinkedIn and on (yes) Facebook, and more detailed instructions for encouraging connections you already have to connect with you on social media. As you read this book, you’ll notice how often the importance of email is mentioned. Social media hasn’t replaced it; in fact, email supports social media efforts and helps you increase followers very directly within each platform. Also, it would be helpful to situate social media in its rightful place among other marketing communication channels like Adwords or even old-school tactics like direct mail. That might be in the sequel. The Art of Social Media should be required reading for every social media professional or for any business owner who does his or her own social media. When you buy it, buy the Kindle version; it contains a wealth of links that take you straight to information in the examples. Like all good books, the reading is easy but it gives you a ton to think about. It may not take you two hours to read the text, but buckle your seatbelt and lay in a supply of coffee because it gives you lots to do. P.S. If...

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What makes a great social media manager?

What makes a great social media manager?

Resist the urge to hand off social media (i.e. marketing) to the intern or the youngest person on staff. Because social media is just one channel in a larger communications picture, it’s too important to give to someone simply because they grew up taking selfies and typing with their thumbs. Here’s what makes a great social media manager: Curiosity. About everything – what’s going on in the world, in the office, in the industry, with customers and donors, all of it. Big-Picture Perspective. Sees social media as one spoke in the very important marketing wheel. Experience. Because social media is so public, immediate, and irretrievable, good judgment is essential. One ill-advised tweet can take you down. Strategic Thinking. Knows the organization’s long- and short-term goals and plans content accordingly. Organization. Has tools in place to curate content on strategic subjects and to stay on task. Creativity. The ability to see the possibilities, to ask “What if?” A great social media manager will find what’s interesting to the audience, or make it so. Education. Nothing will kill a company’s image faster than bad grammar and spelling. Technical Skills. A good working knowledge of HTML and CSS is helpful. PhotoShop abilities, too. Images are king. What would you add to this list? If you found this post useful, share it with your audience. Kim Phillips is a marketer, artist and teacher who helps companies of all sizes reach their audiences with creative branding, social media, websites, content management, email marketing, and direct mail. She is based in Nashville, Tennessee. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+     this post Lucid Marketing can help you make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this site....

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7 signs that mobile marketing has passed you by.

7 signs that mobile marketing has passed you by.

Over half of all web pages are now viewed on mobile devices, and the number is climbing. Sure, a lot of that traffic is checking email, goofing around on social media, and taking online quizzes like “What’s your hippie name?” But it’s also serious business. People aren’t just shopping online, they are buying online, and they are doing it from their phones and tablets. According to the Salesforce 2014 Mobile Behavior Report, 85% of all respondents said that mobile devices are a central part of everyday life. If your new mantra isn’t “mobile first” in all your marketing, you are likely missing a huge chunk of potential business. Here are some signs that mobile may have passed you by: 1. Your website was built in 2009. That would mean it wasn’t built on a platform with “responsive” design, allowing your website to adjust itself to the device on which it is viewed, giving the user a good experience. For a nice example of how responsive web design works, click here. If you’re looking at this blog post on mobile…mazel tov! 2. Your emails aren’t designed for mobile first. If you use a professional email platform like MailChimp, most of them are set up with responsive design, but that doesn’t mean that your headers and graphics look well on all devices. Look at your last e-newsletter on your smart phone, and adjust. 3. You’re not looking at your Google Analytics. This is where you see exactly how much traffic is coming to your site via mobile devices. It will be about half, unless your target market is age 85 or older. Even then, their kids may be researching what you’re selling. Google gives some weight to responsive sites in search results, so if your site isn’t, you are being penalized. Read more about how to fix that. 4. Your competition cares about mobile. When someone is looking for what you do on Google and find that your competitor’s site is easier to use, where will they go? 5. You don’t use mobile for business. You may be in the half of the world that doesn’t, and that’s okay. But if you want to experience your company the way a potential customer does, you have to go see your website where they see it. Push back from the desktop. 6. You think of your website as an online brochure. Websites that are static, never offer new content, or expect visitors to visit every page in the order of navigation don’t recognize how people take in information. Nobody is going to read your long, dry mission statement or product specs. Maybe your home page is a simple call-to-action landing page. Whatever the user...

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Public Not Lovin’ McDonalds New Ad Campaign

Public Not Lovin’ McDonalds New Ad Campaign

I can see the team at the ad agency, working on the new McDonald’s ad campaign. Huddled with their grande lattes, the creative team is desperately trying to figure out something they can talk about besides food.  “What’s trending right now? Somebody look at their Twitter feed.” The new guy pipes up, “Bullying!” Withering looks around the table. “What, we’re going to show Ronald McDonald on a school bus, punching the bully in the nose?” Silence. “You know, that’s not half bad. The bullying thing, I mean.” The world loves to vilify the mac-daddy of fast-food purveyors, and the company keeps serving up reasons to: #4 in unhealthiest fast food chains, according to Consumer Reports, strikes by employees whose wages are so low they can’t afford to eat there, and, for investors, lower sales and profits.  In a well-timed “60 Minutes” interview, McDonald’s CEO, Don Thompson, seemed unperturbed. “If you attack McDonald’s, you’ll get press. And so, you know, just about any and everyone will attack McDonald’s for something,” he said. I got this, says he. He also says that McDonald’s is willing to invest in their employees if the employees are willing to invest in the company. Ask employee Nick Williams if he can invest in McDonald’s. We’ll wait while you mop up the super-sized beverage you just snorted through your nose. Can advertising change the facts? Can it change public perception? McDonald’s thinks so. It will unveil its “Lovin’ Beats Hatin” campaign during the Super Bowl. And the public is already not lovin’ it. Check the Twitter hashtag #lovinbeatshatin. McDonald’s will spend $1 billion on advertising next year, which is evidently cheaper than improving its food or paying its employees a living wage. Maybe the new campaign will be so awwwww-inspiring folks will race from the television or YouTube and stampede through the golden arches for a 1,950-calorie meal* of a double cheeseburger, large fries with one ketchup packet, and a hot fudge sundae. We can’t wait for McDonalds new ad campaign. *McDonald’s calorie counts from independent source If you found this post useful, share it your audience. Kim Phillips is a marketer, artist and teacher who helps companies of all sizes reach their audiences with creative branding, social media, websites, content management, email marketing, and direct mail. She is based in Nashville, Tennessee. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+     this post Lucid Marketing can help you make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should...

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