How much is too much on Twitter?

How much is too much on Twitter?

If you’re wondering if it’s possible to post too often on Twitter, it sort of depends. If you’re a celebrity with a ton of fans, nothing seems to be too much. Even for businesses, it takes being really obnoxious for people to unfollow. It’s just the nature of Twitter; the tweets wash over you in a gentle stream, easy to ignore. That’s about to change. Twitter Inc. has struck a deal with Google Inc. to make its 140-character updates more searchable online. Any marketer paying any attention at all will up the ante on Twitter. There will likely be a torrent of tweets, and those tweeters had better make sure their tweets are strategic, relevant, well-tagged and creative. As the flow increases, the odds of your tweets getting noticed (on Twitter, at least) will decrease. You can use the “spray-and-pray” technique − sheer quantity − or you can actually be interesting. Read the Bloomberg article here. How will you up your Twitter game? If you found this post useful, share it with your audience. Kim Phillips is a marketer, artist and teacher who helps companies of all sizes reach their audiences with creative branding, social media, websites, content management, email marketing, and direct mail. She is based in Nashville, Tennessee. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+   Lucid Marketing can help you make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this site....

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The Art of Social Media: Tips for Power Users – A Review

The Art of Social Media: Tips for Power Users – A Review

A Review of The Art of Social Media: Tips for Power Users By Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick The promotional copy for this new book about how to do social media right claims “no fluff,” and they mean it. The Art of Social Media gets right down to business with practical direction on how to feed the content monster, repurpose your content for maximum effect, and finesse your posts from blogs to Facebook, Google+, Twitter and more. I first encountered Peg Fitzpatrick a few years ago while writing for the 12Most.com blog she co-manages. Since that time, I have seen her everywhere—and I do mean everywhere—in social media. She is one of a handful of social media professionals I follow closely and absolutely trust. Guy Kawasaki, formerly of a little outfit called Apple, is the chief evangelist of Canva. Together, there isn’t much they don’t know about social media and content marketing. The terms “evangelist” and “guru” are so overused that they have actually become objects of derision by professional marketers, and deservedly so. Those labels don’t apply here, because they have overtones of blind devotion to some kind of religion that is entirely about personal belief. Peg and Guy  do have followers, but they earned them by being right. If you didn’t believe before that social media is a real marketing job, you’ll believe it now. If I had any wishes at all for The Art of Social Media, they would be these: a few more paragraphs about the power of professional groups in social media, particularly on LinkedIn and on (yes) Facebook, and more detailed instructions for encouraging connections you already have to connect with you on social media. As you read this book, you’ll notice how often the importance of email is mentioned. Social media hasn’t replaced it; in fact, email supports social media efforts and helps you increase followers very directly within each platform. Also, it would be helpful to situate social media in its rightful place among other marketing communication channels like Adwords or even old-school tactics like direct mail. That might be in the sequel. The Art of Social Media should be required reading for every social media professional or for any business owner who does his or her own social media. When you buy it, buy the Kindle version; it contains a wealth of links that take you straight to information in the examples. Like all good books, the reading is easy but it gives you a ton to think about. It may not take you two hours to read the text, but buckle your seatbelt and lay in a supply of coffee because it gives you lots to do. P.S. If...

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A substitute for creativity.

A substitute for creativity.

Every week or so, I post free online tools that I find around the web. There are lots of great little apps and websites that help people create and share their ideas with others. Not everyone has access to big creative tools like PhotoShop and Illustrator, and not everyone can maintain a full-scale website of their own. But these free tools are not meant to be a substitute for original work. Sure, curation — sharing the content of others — is a legitimate activity, but it should be obvious who the source of the work is. Aggregator sites like AllTop are great places to find — a better word than curate — content to share. I was thrilled when one of my posts made AllTop’s “Holy Kaw” list, ostensibly the best find of the day, and was feeling pretty proud that my original thoughts would be shared across the internet; clearly whoever curates AllTop has excellent taste. Then I got sucked into a post with a funny title (I’m not giving you the link because I don’t want the poster to get the traffic, but you see it here). The post that made it to the Holy Kaw list is comprised of a generic graphic (generic in the sense that the visual has nothing to do with the words) created in Canva, a minimal introduction, and a link to an actual article that Paul Anthony Jones at Mental Floss went to the trouble to compose. In fact, a little scrolling shows that all five of the Holy Kaw posts of the day use graphics “created” in Canva. All are basically introductions to longer, original articles by other writers, and some include graphics or video from those articles. Three are posted by the same guy who posted the one you see here, the other two were posted by a gal using the same technique. From all the gazillion posts by blogs listed on AllTop (including this one, for the moment), are we to believe that there are only two “authors” worthy of the Holy Kaw list? It is a delightful coincidence that Guy Kawasaki, who runs AllTop, is also the official “Chief Evangelist” of Canva. Again, nothing wrong with curation. Most online marketers, content marketers, and social media marketers would say that AllTop is simply content marketing — for Canva — at its finest. Sort of content marketing on steroids. Just be sure to click through to the real authors of the real content, and don’t use this technique as a substitute for creativity. If this post was helpful, you can subscribe at the top of the page; please share with a colleague. To the lawyers, this is a review, an opinion piece, to which...

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How Facebook sees spam could change your Facebook posting strategy.

How Facebook sees spam could change your Facebook posting strategy.

Recently Facebook announced that it would limit the amount of spammy posts in Facebook feeds. It will be interesting to see if this reduces the like-farm posts that spread spam like wildfire on Facebook, the ones with a million likes from some page you never heard of. But what about legitimate posts from businesses like yours and mine?  When you ask, in a business page post, “Please like and share,” will Facebook consider that “like-baiting?” Here’s what Facebook for Business has to say: “Like-baiting” is when a post explicitly asks News Feed readers to like, comment or share the post in order to garner additional distribution. That’s pretty broad. You can read the rest of the announcement here. As always, the best Facebook posting strategy includes fresh, original content that engages your fan base. Easy, right? If you need help with your Facebook posting strategy, give me a call. If this post was helpful, you can subscribe at the top of the page; please share with a colleague. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+     this post With over 30 years of experience in financial services marketing, Lucid Marketing has the skills to make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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Is native advertising a waste of time?

Is native advertising a waste of time?

By now we can pretty much agree that the firewall between editorial and advertising has crumbled into the dust of ancient history. Frankly, I’m not sure it wasn’t a fiction for some publications anyway. In fact, I once tried to drop a press release back in the day when advertising and PR were two distinct disciplines and was told by the publication that I really needed to buy some advertising if I expected the news item to run. But back to today. “Native advertising,” sort of an advertorial on steroids, is institutionalized line-blurring between what seems like editorial and ends up being advertising. It’s just done with more finesse. If you, the advertiser, choose to do native advertising in a publication like Forbes, you’re piggybacking and will pay lavishly for the ride. If the native ad is good and the reader follows the trail back to you, which brand gets the most benefit, Forbes or yours? Some think it’s not your brand getting the benefit. Perhaps you should spend your efforts and your dollars building your own brand with your own content on your own site rather than be a digital sharecropper. On the other hand, that requires an investment in a solid brand, a publishing platform (whatever that looks like for you), and a steady stream of original content. It’s do-able: which do you prefer? If this post was helpful, you can subscribe at the top of the page; please share with a colleague. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+   this post With over 30 years of experience in financial services marketing, Lucid Marketing has the skills to make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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Feeding the monster: 7 ways to create a ton of great content marketing.

Feeding the monster: 7 ways to create a ton of great content marketing.

One of the advantages of being around a while is that you get to see trends as they happen. I watched as television went from rabbit-ears to cable, computing went from mainframe to desktop, and comedians went from clubs to, well, everywhere. When comics mostly worked little clubs, they could do the same shtick over and over and didn’t need much new material until they had played the entire circuit. Rodney Dangerfield got by with the same 20 jokes for so many years that that fact actually became the joke. Now, the entire circuit is played in a second. You publish something online, and you instantly need something else. The internet is a very hungry monster. 1. Have a content strategy. What does your audience care about? What can you serve up to improve their situations? 2. Plan out your topics. This will be your content menu. 3. Make it tasty. Engage your followers with a wide variety of content. 4. Stir the pot. Combine different types of content, from videos and sound clips to games, contests, and polls. 5. Dish it out regularly. How often will depend on how engaged your fans are. If they like your stuff enough, nothing is too often. Most content providers don’t post often enough. 6. Don’t get eaten by the competition. If you’re not talking to your followers and creating new ones, your competition is. 7. Cook up your own stuff. Reposting articles by others is a useful part of your content strategy, but that engages people with someone else’s brand. What’s your recipe for feeding the content marketing monster? If this post was helpful, you can subscribe at the top of the page; please share with a colleague. Contact Me | Facebook | Twitter @LucidKim | LinkedIn  | Google+   {{ CLICK TO TWEET }} With over 30 years of experience in financial services marketing, Lucid Marketing has the skills to make your marketing the best it can be. Call us today at 615.829.0772 or click here to send an email. Copyright Notice: The contents of this site are copyrighted by Lucid Marketing, all rights reserved. Republication by permission only, with a link back and the source of the republication clearly noted. Excerpts, commentary, and fair use applications should be accompanied by a link back to the original content on this...

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