You can't get to a good place in a bad way.

Update on Earlier Post about Fluid Salon Clearly Fluid Salon’s owner, Sarah Cameron, underestimated the amount of flak that would be generated by her “Look good in all you do” campaign that makes use of violence against women. Her shop has been vandalized and she says she has received death threats. Still, she says, “I’m not sorry for using and (my friends) experiences to make a series which was intended to show strong women in situations no one wants to talk about.” And, she claims that some people have made donations to the local women’s shelter after having seen the campaign, a “silver lining.” Perhaps there would have been another way to focus attention on violence against women. The women in the ads don’t look strong, they look downtrodden. They don’t look like they’ve been to a salon, either. Another justification Cameron cites for the campaign is that it only appeared online and wasn’t published on billboards or in print ads. It seems a bit disingenuous that someone who grew up in the digital age doesn’t understand that the reach of the internet passes traditional, local advertising at warp speed. Now she understands the power of social media, where the ads did appear. As inadvisable as the campaign was, vandalizing Fluid’s building and threatening the owner with physical violence do not constitute righteous indignation: they are crimes. Fluid’s owner threw out some gasoline, and these violent detractors are putting the match to it. The most effective means of protesting the ads will be to stay away: customers and prospects can vote with their feet. But they may not comment negatively on the salon’s blog; only supportive comments are being posted. It seems that discussion really wasn’t what the salon wanted, and that more attention is being drawn to Fluid than to violence against...

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5 reasons it might be OK to mess with your logo.

5 reasons it might be OK to mess with your logo.

Changing a logo is something to be done rarely and only with one goal in mind:  to help the target audience understand your brand better. Here are five reasons you may want to consider tweaking or overhauling your logo. You are one of the biggest brands in the world and can get away with it. Diet Coke wanted a fresher, bolder look that would make their brand stand out from the myriads of other soda brands on the shelf. So, they zoomed in on the logo to the brink of abstraction, presenting it in a whole new way. The reason you still know it’s Diet Coke is that you’ve seen the whole logo a bazillion times now. Your logo looks like it was created 30 years ago:             Your logo gives no clue of what you do:             Your logo looks like your kid did it:           Would this be better?             Your logo simply won’t fit where it’s going. The most popular social media platforms only allow a teensy profile pic or logo. On Facebook, since the company’s name sits right next to that pic, why not just use whatever graphic element is part of the logo?         It’s usually not recommended to use a logo’s graphic without the logo’s words, but new media call for new methods. Does your logo represent your brand’s promise? Does it need a facelift? Join us on Facebook | follow on Twitter...

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